Columns

EMS Classics is a feature column I write for Canadian Paramedicine.

It is my attempt at giving the younger generation who work in EMS today, a snapshot into the history of ambulance service.

If you are interested in purchasing the images or the text copyright to any of the columns please email me at EMSClassics@shaw.ca

All proceeds are donated to the Paramedic Association of Canada Benevolent Society.

EMSClassics.com Column

1978 Crestline Oldsmobile - This station-wagon featured a raised roof and a body extension aft of the rear wheels. This experimental coach was sold to a funeral home in Grand Forks, British Columbia for $16,000.

EMSClassics.com Column

1979 Crestline Chevrolet - This station-wagon was lengthened 14 inches in the rear doors. This coach served for many years with Binkley's Funeral Service in Shaunavon, Saskatchewan.

EMSClassics.com Column

1981 Crestline Oldsmobile - This station-wagon had a raised roof and an extended wheelbase. This coach was manufactured for the Eventide Funeral Home of Red Deer, Alberta.

EMSClassics.com Column

1982 Crestline GM Suburban - This Suburban was converted to a funeral coach for Speer's Funeral Chapel of Regina, Saskatchewan. It was their designated "rural roads" coach.

EMSClassics.com Column

1982 Crestline Dodge - This Dodge Maxivan featured a full-width bench seat ahead of the partition. It was custom built for Parkside Memorial of Swift Current, Saskatchewan.

Buy This Column and Images Now ($150)

Column 00B

Crestline Hearses

(This article was published in The Professional Car magazine issue #128.)

Crestline Coach began in 1975 as a division of Crescent Ambulance Service in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada. During the early Crestline years we manufactured ambulances as well as hearses and limousines. A total of 14 hearses were manufactured, 6 of which were based on station wagons, 5 on GM Suburbans, and 3 on Dodge Maxivans.

Our objective was to produce hearses that were priced lower than those imported from the US. But at the lower prices, it was a struggle to remain profitable. Meanwhile the demand for our ambulances was growing rapidly throughout Western Canada, so in 1983 the manufacture of hearses and limousines was discontinued in order to devote all of our resources to the manufacture of ambulances.